08/12/2021

Sony has registered a patent for a new user interface

A new Sony Interactive Entertainment patent has been found which details plans for a new UI. It is possible that the PlayStation 5 interface could be getting an upgrade.

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Japanese gaming blog Game Jouhou & Blog 2.0, which gathers gaming information and rumours, has found a new patent registered by Sony. The patent describes a new user interface that will allow users to access different applications during gameplay without returning to the home screen.

While Sony has not announced that there will be upcoming changes to the PlayStation 5 UI the proposed changes could be something it is considering. The other possibility is it is in consideration for another hardware device.

Translated by NME, the patent reads:

“The window can be fixed to the GUI and the user can automatically change to another application. If they want to stream music, the game must be paused and the music streaming icon must be selected from the home screen. — If the user requests this menu, depending on the application the menu will cover at least part of the screen.”

Sony has registered a number of patents recently seemingly related to the PlayStation 5. It registered a patent for an “ornamental design for a cover for an electronic device” believed to be a new style of PlayStation 5 faceplate. A patent granted to Sony last month (October 19) described micro-transactions for spectators to “remove player from game“.

Neither of these have been implemented yet, and companies often patent ideas simply to protect them from use by other companies. We will have to wait to see if the new UI comes to light.

In other news, Battlefield 2042 players are hiding in buildings that have no collision boxes and Japanese retailers have been using lotteries and marking boxes to fight back against PlayStation 5 scalpers.

The post Sony has registered a patent for a new user interface appeared first on NME.

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